The list below covers all news items relating to Tesla from this website's launch in October 2018 to present:

  • Monday 30th September: Autoblog: ‘First videos of Tesla’s new Smart Summon feature a mixed bag’. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 1st October: Inside EVs: ‘[ Tesla sales were higher than all gasoline and diesel passenger car sales combined. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 2nd October: Autoblog: ‘Tesla plans to start production in Shanghai this month’. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 2nd October: EV Specifications: ‘Tesla registers record production and deliveries in Q3 of 2019’. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 4th October: Electrek: ‘15 Tesla Semi electric trucks to replace diesel trucks at Pepsi facility’. (Original article from 2019)
  • Saturday 5th October: Electrek: ‘Polestar 2 price finalized in Europe: €59k, competitive with Tesla Model 3’. (Original article from 2019)
  • Saturday 5th October: Reuters: ‘U.S. agency reviews whether 2,000 Teslas should have been recalled’. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 24th September: Autoblog report: ‘Elon Musk allegedly pushed SolarCity deal despite major cash crunch’. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 25th September: Teslarati report: ‘Norway gas station replaces fuel pumps with electric car fast chargers’. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 26th September: Tesla’s blog post: ‘Introducing Software Version 10.0’. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 26th September: Inside EVs: ‘Tesla Is Expected To Deliver Record 100,000 Cars This Quarter’. (Original article from 2019)
  • Saturday 28th September: Autoblog: ‘U.S. labor judge rules that Tesla broke labor law’. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 16th September: Autoblog also report that Toyota have switched to use Panasonic-supplied batteries in some of their Chinese PHEVs: very similar batteries to the ones used in a Tesla. Panasonic have a well established supply of EV batteries, so this move helps Toyota’s future supply stability. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 17th September: Green Car Reports have some unique news/analysis of VW’s future electric plans in America, saying that the ID 3 will not launch there, but the ID 4 will do - and it could undercut a Tesla Model Y by as much as $10,000. VW’s aim is to “make the comparison to a comparable internal combusion car” in terms of price. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 18th September: IIHS, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, have picked the Tesla Model 3 for its first ever “TOP SAFETY PICK+” award. This means that they feel the Model 3 is amongst the safest cars available (as previous test results) have shown, including external factors like headlight glare and pedestrian collision prevention. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 10th September: Electrek report that Tesla have now added pedestrian warning sounds to the Tesla Model 3, to start complying to up-and-coming regulations for sounds to be played at low speeds to prevent pedestrian collisions. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 12th September: A Tweet from Elon Musk says that the Tesla Model S being raced on the Nurburgring is a new 7-seater prototype, which is thought could be available to customers soon. (Original article from 2019)
  • Saturday 14th September: Clean Technica has some analysis on Tesla’s new solar panels which come in at $1.01/watt, in an article which Elon Musk said was some great analysis. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 5th September: The Guardian report on great news for Tesla: that their Model 3 car was the third best selling car in August. That might not sound like much, but that is for the entire car market: one dominated by gasoline car sales. Only the Ford Fiesta and VW Golf sold more than the Model 3, which sold 2,082 units. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 5th September: EV sales in Norway - the powerhouse of European EV sales - are in for August 2019, showing a 13% rise in all-electric sales, in an otherwise sinking market with 17% fewer gasoline/diesel car sales and 38% fewer PHEV sales. The VW e-Golf was the best seller with 1,083 sales, with the Tesla Model 3 in #2 position at 649 sales. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 6th September: EV Lens report on an Elon Musk tweet which says that the Tesla Model S will be run on the Nürburgring race track, which was recently covered by the Taycan who did the 20.6 km track in 7 minutes and 42 seconds. It will be interesting to see the Model S’ results! (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 26th August: EV sales for Europe July 2019 are out, showing a strong 32% growth compared to July 2018, at 36,000 plug-in sales. The Renault Zoe re-gained the #1 spot with 3,969 sales compared to the #2 Tesla Model 3 with 3,478 sales. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 26th August: Autoblog report that Tesla are raising their prices in China in response to the ongoing American-Chinese trade war which has raised tariffs on their cars (by 25% on vehicles and 5% on auto parts). (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 28th August: Electrek examine Tesla’s newly launched insurance program, which was first mentioned by Elon Musk two years ago. Tesla’s InsureMyTesla program apparently offers “up to 30% cheaper” insurance than the American competition, and there are plans for this program to be offered in other countries (in due course) too. (Original article from 2019)
  • Saturday 31st August: Autoblog report that earlier rumors about Tesla planning price hikes in China will now not go ahead, beacause the Chinese government are exempting Tesla from the incoming 10% foreign car purchase fee. It is thought that China see Tesla as an important foreign auto maker and thus have made this Tesla-specific exemption. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 20th August: Electrek report that the new Tesla Gigafactory 3 (in Shanghai, China) has achieved a big milestone: it has been cleared by the authorities to start production fairly soon. The local authorities have helped to support the Gigafactory’s development where possible, which is important to Tesla to grow on the Asian markets - and also avoid the American-China trade war. Elon Musk tweeted the following regarding this news: (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 22nd August: Autoblog report on VW’s CEO Herbet Diess saying that they would be interested in buying Tesla shares, since VW could profit from Tesla’s expertise with software and batteries. Buying the whole company would, as you can imagine, be a bit too much for VW - however (plus you cannot imagine Musk selling Tesla to VW). (Original article from 2019)
  • Sunday 25th August: Euro News says that Tesla are scouting out sites in Germany to build a factory, possibly in North Rhine-Westphalia, with first inspections already having been completed. This follows from previously reports news, and tweets from Elon Musk in April, which said that Tesla were considering building a Gigafactory in the strategic European market. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 12th August: Autoblog cover a Tesla Model 3 which “exploded” (caught fire) after a collision with another vehicle which the driver “had failed to see”. Plenty of gasoline cars catch fire every day, too, so we do not see this as a massive new item - but it does follow on from a few ‘spontaneous’ Tesla car fires, so we want to keep an eye on such news stories. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 13th August: Engadget report that Jaguar have started to promote its all-electric I-Pace luxury car by battling with Tesla. Tesla owners can get $3,000 off an I-Pace which, coupled with other discounts, could see an I-Pace be bought for just $54,500 - substantially cheaper than the $69,500 MSRP. Of course, this is still more expensive than the $37,000+ Model 3, so the question will be whether the I-Pace offers good enough technology and performance to achieve a $20,000+ premium over the Model 3. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 14th August: Autoblog cover the Audi E-Tron which is the first EV to receive the “Top Safety Pick+” award by the American IIHS car safety testing department. This is good for Audi whose SUV is $75,795 (not include tax rebates), however the Jaguar I-Pace, Tesla Model X and 3 have not yet been fully tested. The Model X and 3 received great safety ratings in Europe’s NCAP agency testing, however. The crash video of the E-Tron from IIHS is below: (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 16th August: Inside EVs report that the Tesla Model 3 was close to being the best selling car in California (i.e. including gasoline car sales) in the first half of the year, with 33,005 sales - just behind the Toyota Camry with 33,638 sales and 39,018 Honda Civic sales. This is a major change compared to car sales data from 2+ years ago wherein EVs did not really have a look-in. Fully electric cars sales were the fastest growing segment in these sales figures. (Original article from 2019)
  • Saturday 17th August: CNN have published an interesting interactive guide into the electric car race between Tesla, VW and Audi and ‘who will win’ (or in reality, how much each will grow their slice of the EV market) by 2040 when gasoline sales should be substantially lower than they are today. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 6th August: EV sales data shows the top 5 electric cars sold to date: the Nissan Leaf still leads with 422,708 sales, not completely unexpected as it has been out for a decade. But the Tesla Model 3 - released to the mainstream just last year - is almost joint second place with 276,193 sales, a thousand sales behind the Model S. We predicted last year that the Model 3 will become the best selling EV by the end of 2020, and we still think that this is possible. In the 6 months since writing that article, the Leaf has sold 50,000 models whilst the Model 3 has sold 130,000 models - 2-3x more. If this carries on, the Model 3 could be the world’s best selling EV before the end of 2020, despite being one of the newest mass-market EVs. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 6th August: Jay Leno says that he loves his Telsa and sees barely any reasons to own a gasoline car, according to CNBC. His positive endorsement said that they have barely any maintenance and are faster: “For new technology to succeed, it can’t be equal, … It’s got to be better and [Tesla] sort of solved the battery problem. It can go 350 to 400 miles at a charge… There’s no maintenance. They’re faster than the gas car. So there’s almost no reason to have a gas car unless you’re doing long-haul duty”. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 7th August: Autoblog report on a public spat that Tesla have had with the NHTSA, who have said that Tesla are misrepresenting the safety of the Model 3. Various subpoenas and cease-and-desist letters have been served on Tesla, due to concerns that the Model 3 is not as safe as claimed. Tesla have hit back saying that it is “the safest car ever built” with a much lower risk of injury than any other tested car. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 7th August: American convenience store chain Wawa are aiming to double the number of their Tesla superchargers at their locations, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. Lori Bruce from Waw said that 30 or more of its stores will have Tesla Superchargers by the end of 2020, up from 16 currently. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 8th August: Autoblog report on potential trouble for Tesla: a lawsuit from a Tesla owner who claims that a recent company software update has lowered his car’s range instead of fixing defective battery packs. The lawsuit is seeking a class action for the “thousands” of Model S and X owners who - they claim - have lost up to 40 miles (64 km) of range in the May 2019 update. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 29th July: EV sales for Europe in June 2019 are out, showing a 24% year on year rise in plug-in sales (PHEV + EV), a good performance in a market which continues to stagnate in general. The Tesla Model 3 sold 3x as many cars as the next best selling model (the Renault Zoe) with 11,604 units sold in June 2019. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 31st July: EV Sales data globally for June 2019 is out, with 67% more sales compared to June 2018 - a large rise in green car sales at 265,000 overall units sold. This is mainly due to the Tesla Model 3 continuing to shine with 39,632 sales and the cheaper Chinese car the BAIC EU-Series selling well with 17,916 units sold. (Original article from 2019)
  • Sunday 4th August: Tesla are aiming to boost sales of their more expensive Model S and X models, by bringing back free supercharging on them (they previously scraped this offer around 6 months ago). This might go hand in hand with a change reported last week that the Model S and X were now a bit more expensive, meaning Tesla may have just priced this offer in already. Nonetheless, it is good to see that such a premium EV comes with a big benefit in the form of free supercharging: (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 22nd July: Motortrend have done some really useful, detailed testing on the Tesla V3 supercharger (using a Model 3 performance model). Charging speeds hit 254 kW and stabilized at the slightly-lower 250 kW, which is the advertised speed. However this dropped after a few minutes, to a low of 130 kW. This is somewhat expected, and a 0-100% charge time of 1 hour and 15 minutes is quicker than V2 supercharger speeds - but not quite double the speed, as Tesla’s blog claimed. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 23rd July: Another interesting article is from Electrek who say that Tesla has built a “giant machine” which will produce the upcoming Model Y crossover’s body in a single piece. This will be achieved via patented technology which outlines a way of creating “A multi-directional casting machine for casting a frame of a vehicle”, and it is reported that this new approach will lead to significant build cost reductions as it will reduce the number of parts (and thus assembly of those parts) from 70 down to just 1. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 24th July: CNBC report on Tesla’s Q2 2019 earning report which seemed positive at first glance, but led to Tesla share price falls after investors digested its contents. Whilst their all-important cash situation improved, revenues were slightly lower than expected and the quarterly loss was also a bit bigger than expected. Tesla have re-iterated that they still expect to hit their end of year targets, though, via a stronger Q3/Q4. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 25th July: After Tesla’s mixed Q2 earnings report, it has been reported by Autoblog that their electric battery expert (and CTO) - J.B. Straubel - is stepping down. This is a blow for Tesla as Straubel is seen by many as the quiet but very effective ‘behind the scenes’ engineering master within Tesla. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 25th July: Inside EVs report that Tesla will open a European Gigafactory in 2021, with the exact location currently undecided but Germany being the favorite country right now. This will save Tesla time and money compared to building cars in America and Asia and shipping them overseas. Elon Musk said that “Our plan is to source cars to greater Europe area from Fremont, California until we have [the] European Gigafactory operational… it’s probably 2021 before we have an operational Gigafactory in Europe”. (Original article from 2019)
  • Saturday 27th July: Tesla and Elon Musk have sent out a few tweets (shown below) which annnounced (1) the addition of a chess game in the on-screen Tesla Arcade, (2) the ability to stream YouTube and Netflix when the car is stopped and (3) the ability to stream them when the car is in auto-pilot: but only after regulators approve this: (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 16th July: Elon Musk has tweeted a warning to potential Tesla customers, and those looking to upgrade to self-driving on their existing cars, by saying that the price (of the full self-driving option) will rise by $1,000 on August 16th: (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 16th July: Autoblog report that Tesla have dropped their standard range Model S and X cars, meaning that the new cheapest cars are around $5,000 more expensive: granted, with better performance and range. This move continues Tesla’s strategy of simplifying their car line-up: or, dare we say it, pushing people towards the Model 3 which has more options available than the Model S now. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 17th July: Green Car Reports have spotted some Tesla self driving news: that the previously-announced “full self-driving” chip should be ready for Q4 of this year. The new chip will cost $3,000-$5,000 to upgrade to and it will only work on Tesla cars produced after October 2015. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 17th July: Tesla’s Shanghai Gigafactory 3 is continuing to ramp-up its production, with the first Asian-produced Model 3s due by the end of 2019, as EV Specifications report. Tao Lin, Tesla’s Global VP, says that “the supply chain is constantly being optimized and will find suitable partners on a global scale to upgrade the Shanghai plant effectiveness.”. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 17th July: Electrek report on the hotly awaited Tesla rival, the Porsche Taycan, saying that it will be 250 kW on its release date, with 350 kW EVSE car charging rates due in 2021. This scales back a little on their previous claims, but 250 kW charging at launch is still on-par with their Tesla rivals (just not massively beating it, like they originally suggested it would do). (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 18th July: A great video from Tesla shows off their new V3 supercharger in Las Vegas, whose car charging points are becoming self-sufficient via the use of renewable energies (such as large solar panels which store up the energy): (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 18th July: Chinese EV sales for June 2019 are out and they show an invigorated market: with 72% growth compared to June 2018 at 147,000 registrations, backed up all-electric sales rising a huge 97% year on year. The top 5 cars feature the Tesla Model 3 (with 6,500 sales), which is surprising in that usually Chinese-own cars occupy the top 5 spots each month. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 9th July: Elon Musk has confirmed on Twitter that Tesla has no plans to refresh or revamp the Tesla Model S or X luxury cars, instead planning a series of minor changes but definitely no interior or exterior revamp: (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 10th July: Despite Tesla “reducing its headcount” (aka reducing staff numbers) previously, it looks like they might now increase production and increase its headcount, according to Bloomberg. This is after a record breaking Q2 for Tesla which seen a record number of deliveries, and consistently good Model 3 sales buoying the company’s financial outlook. Tesla’s automotive president Jeroem Guillen said in an email to employees that “As we continue to ramp up production, please tell your friends and neighbors that we have lots of exciting new positions open, both in Fremont and at Giga”, which sent Tesla shares up a couple of percentage points. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 11th July: In interesting EVSE car charging news, Tesla will allow for the Model 3 to be charged via the alternative Japanese-designed CHAdeMO chargers, as Green Car Reports explore. This will be made available via a special $450 adapter, which is pricy but it could be a big lifeline to Model 3 owners whose area mainly includes CHAdeMO charging stations. (Original article from 2019)
  • Saturday 13th July: The upcoming new Tesla Roadster X will feature a space-age rocket booster package (as part of an optional upgrade) using SpaceX technology, and these cold-air boosters will be hidden behind the license plate: (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 2nd July: Tesla’s battle with keeping top level executives has had another blow, with three vice presidents leaving in a week, as Electrek report. We mentioned last week that Peter Hochholdinger (VP of production) was leaving, but now it seems like Jan Oehmicke (VP of Europe) and Steve MacManus (VP of interior/exterior engineering) have also left. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 2nd July: In great news for Tesla, Tesla produced 87,048 cars and delivered more than that (95,200) in the second quarter of 2019, a new company record which sent TSLA shares up 8% in aftermarket trading, as Electrek examine. Their previous record was 90,700 deliveries, however Q1 seen just over 60,000 units delivered - so this Q2 2019 data is a big increase and suggests that previous doubts about Tesla’s financial position may not have been fully warranted. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 3rd July: Tesla’s Model 3 has received a 5 star Euro NCAP safety rating, the highest possible (albeit one that many cars nowadays achieve). The more detailed ratings (covering external factors like pedestrians walking into the road) were all very positive, too. The crash video is always fun to watch: (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 5th July: EV Sales data for America in June 2019 are also out, showing green car sales up 51% year on year with 38,000 plug-in models sold, with the Tesla Model 3 receiving 45% of the plug-in car sales. Non-Tesla green car sales were down 12%, however, meaning that this was a very Tesla-heavy month in America. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 24th June: Despite the ongoing trade war, America has waived tariffs on Japanese aluminum - a request of Tesla (to the Department of Commerce) after arguing that domestic aluminum sources are not of sufficient quality, as Autoblog examine. 10,000 tonnes can now be imported from Japan’s Nippon Light Metal Co Ltd into America for use by Tesla and their battery cells. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 26th June: Autoblog report that Peter Hochholdinger, Tesla’s VP of Production at its Fremont factory, has quit Tesla after being with them for three years. Tesla are making a big push for their Q2 production/delivery to try and have a record-breaking quarter: the next few weeks will confirm if this was a success or not. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 28th June: EV Sales also look at the worldwide sales data for May 2019, showing that registrations only increased 12% year on year, but this is mainly due to a rapidly cooling Chinese market. The Tesla Model 3 was the best selling green car in May 2019, with 10% of overall sales (at 17,965 registrations), surpassing the BYD Yuan EV and BAIC EU-Series Chinese cars with 6,000-7,000 sales and a 4% share of the market. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 28th June: A general reminder that this is the last working day to get the $3,750 federal tax credit for Tesla cars. This is going down to just $1,875 (half) on 1st July, which will then fall to $0 at the end of the year. Unless the federal tax credit scheme is expanded out (as reported earlier), GM cars will also be following this path of declining tax credits. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 18th June: UK sales data for the first four months of the year has been reported by EV Sales, which shows a 29% year on year increase compared to the start of 2018, but which doesn’t have any Tesla models in the top 5 models sold - especially since Model 3 sales only really started (in the UK) in late May 2019. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 18th June: Tesla have announced in a tweet that Tesla cars will now have a racing game (similar to Super Mario Kart) which can be played when the car is parked up - such as charging up - via the steering wheel and pedals! The game - Beach Buggy Racing 2 - is part of the ‘Tesla Arcade’ feature: (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 10th June: Tesla employee approval ratings are way down, as Autoblog examine. This is no real surprise, though, due to the large layoffs and cost-cutting exercises that we have reported previously. Their Glassdoor ratings have fallen from 3.6/5 in 2017 to 3.2/5 today, with Elon Musk’s approval rating dropping to just 52% (down from 90%). (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 11th June: Green Car Reports mention that Tesla are considering opening up their big centre screens to third party app developers, instead of just developing the apps themselves (potentially with worse support than if third party companies developed some of the apps). (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 11th June: Autoblog are saying that Elon Musk told the annual shareholders meeting that Tesla have “a decent shot at a record quarter on every level,”, leading to a 3.6% rise in their share price to $225 per share. _(Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 12th June: Following on the same theme, Autoblog say that Tesla’s pickup will be unveiled this summer whilst their larger Semi truck will be delayed a year. It’s hard to know which Elon Musk claims can truly be believed (especially since he also said that Tesla have designed a submarine car like the one from a James Bond Film!), but a Tesla pickup would rival offerings from Rivian and Ford and therefore it makes sense for Tesla to unveil one sooner rather than later. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 13th June: Green Car Reports report on analysis from iSeeCars which shows that electric cars lose their value quicker than fossil-fuel powered cars, with Tesla vehicles being the exception. The Fiat 500e had the quickest depreciated, with the BMW i3 being ‘runner up’. Depreciation of 60-70% over 3 years (for EVs) was not uncommon in their analysis. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 29th May: The Tesla Model S will undergo a refresh later in 2019, with a more minimalist interior (similar to the Model 3) due, according to Green Car Reports. This would be an interesting move, because the Model 3 is obviously far more premium than the Model 3 - so unless the price of the cut-down Model S is lower, it will be hard to see how this would improve sales in the Model S. This move will, however, improve Tesla’s financial position by making their car lineups cheaper (due to having more standardization). (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 30th May: Autoblog report on Elon Musk’s email to his Tesla staff, saying that Q2 deliveries are lagging behind, but if they successfully “catch up” then they will have a “successful quarter… an all-time record for Tesla vehicle deliveries and an awesome victory!!”. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 3rd June: The Tesla Model Y will be built in Fremont, California and have a lower range than the Model 3, according to Autoblog. They feel that, unlike producing it in its Asian “Gigafactory 3”, this will be the “fastest way to get to volume production” of the Model Y. _(Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 3rd June: Green Car Reports report further information from Tesla, saying that a Tesla truck “won’t look like a normal truck”, instead of like something out of sci-fi. Also Chinese Model 3 production will start later this year, and the care will be priced around $7,100 cheaper than the current import price (at $47,500 USD/328,000 Yuan). (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 5th June: Green Car Reports have noticed that Telsa have updated their website to have clearer online pricing, moving away from prices which include a “gas savings discount” - even though this still needs to be paid as part of the purchase price. The new pricing is therefore clearer for prospective customers. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 20th May: Elon Musk will embark on big cost saving initiatives (i.e. cuts to expenses) because even a big investment might not be enough for the long-term, as Green Car Reports explore. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 21st May: Stock market investors and analysts have been reacting to Tesla’s latest market statements, and AutoBlog say that a Morgan Stanley report says that Tesla shares could plummet to just $10/share (down from $195/share at the time of writing) in the absolute worst case scenario. Of course, they could rise to $310/share in the best case scenario, so it is a pretty big range. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 22nd May: GM have unveiled their new electrical architecture which will involve Tesla-style over the air updates, as Autoblog examine. Their next-gen electrical platform should be “five times more capable” than GM’s current electric platform. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 22nd May: Consumer Reports have kept a close eye on Tesla’s autopilot functionality, previously raising concerns about its braking ability. Now they have said that the system can require “significant driver intervention” in a number of cases, including that the new lane-change features can cut-off other vehicles in an unsafe manner. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 23rd May: Despite some concerns about Tesla’s finances from outside sources, Tesla are on-track to produce a record number of vehicles this quarter - as AutoBlog report, based on a leaked email to employees. They will produce more than the 90,700 cars they sold to customers in Q4 of 2018. (Original article from 2019)
  • Sunday 26th May: The Times (paywall) report on Tesla’s increasingly worrying financial position, saying that they risk “running out of road now [their] rivals have woken up” - saying that other EV (and ICE) car manufacturers will be a bigger threat to Tesla as time goes on. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 13th May: a great article from The Drive explores the issues with Tesla’s touchscreens, which are ‘industrial quality’ but not ‘automative quality’. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 13th May: We have a further look at the tech challenger Dyson’s 2021 EV via a patent they have released, as Green Car Reports explore. This long and fairly low-down SUV could challenge the Tesla Model X. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 14th May: The expected ramp-up of Tesla Model Y production (even though some will be in Asia) will affect battery supply according to Tesla battery supplier Panasonic, as Bloomberg reports. In a strong quote, Panasonic’s CEO said “Batteries will run out if Tesla starts to sell the Model Y and expands its business next year,”. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 15th May: Reuters have an exclusive story saying that Tesla’s solar panels (produced in their solar factory, and marketed as being for their ‘solar roof’) are mainly exported off-shore instead of being used in their solar roof or elsewhere in America. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 16th May: Reuters report on a third fatal Tesla crash which occurred when autopilot was on, saying that it “renews questions about the system”. This relates to the March 1st 2019 crash of a Model 3 in Delray Beach, Florida. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 16th May: A spontaneous Tesla fire in China last month has led to Tesla rolling out an over-the-air update which will better-manage the “charge and thermal management settings” to protect the battery and longevity, as Auto Blog examine. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 6th May: The EPA have confirmed the official ranges for the Tesla revamped line-up cars, with the Model 3 Standard Range Plus having a 240 mile (386 km) range, and the Tesla Model S Long Range having a massive 370 mile (595 km) range, as Green Car Reports covers. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 10th May: Chargepoint have seen a Tesla Model Y (SUV) in the ‘wild’, being road tested - or at least moved to another Tesla location: (Original article from 2019)
  • Saturday 11th May: EV Specifications cover that Tesla have made Model 3 leases cheaper, for just $399 per month. This follows on previous news where various commentators thought the previous lease deal was too expensive. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 29th April: EV Sales look at Europe’s March data, in what they call a “Tesla Model 3 Tsunami”. 60,000 registrations marked a 38% growth compared to March 2018, of which over a quarter (15,771) were from Tesla Model 3! The previously best selling car (The Renault Zoe) had 4,361 deliveries - showing the scale of the Model 3’s sales in Europe. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 1st May: The Audi e-tron, a Tesla-rival (or so they hope!), is already seeing buyer discounts - even before properly being launched/sold, as Green Car Reports examine. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 1st May: Tesla have unveiled a super low range (93 mile/150 km) Model 3 in Canada to quality for the $5,000 CAD EV discount which is capped at EVs costing less than $45,000 CAD, from Autoblog. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 1st May: Techcrunch report that Tesla is being sued by the family of an Apple engineer who claim that his fatal road traffic accident is caused by the car’s autopilot functionality. This relates to last year’s accident where a Model X crashed into a concrete highway divider. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 2nd May: Tesla have announced a $1.5-2 billion cash raising scheme (via convertible note and share sales) to help raise necessary funds after an expensive (i.e. cash-depleting!) first quarter, reports Bloomberg. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 2nd May: The Tesla blog announces yet more over-the-air enhancements to autopilot, including lane departure avoidance and emergency lane departure avoidance. The former is a more gentle warning than the first, but both should mean that tired, possibly unengaged drivers, will keep to their lane and be prompted to be engaged as soon as possible. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 2nd May: Great news for UK Tesla fans: the right-hand-drive Model 3 is now available to order, as Next Green Car mention. The starting price is £38,900 for the Standard Range Plus model with 258 miles (415 km) of range - going up to £56,900 for the Performance model with 329 miles (530 km) of range. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 22nd April: The BBC report that Tesla have sent an “investigation” squad to China after social media videos show a Tesla Model S going up in flames, seemingly for no reason. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 22nd April: Tesla have hyped up their self-driving technology in a 4 hour long presentation which was live-streamed on YouTube (and is embedded below) as part of their ‘Tesla Autonomy Day’: (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 24th April:The Tesla blog reports that a new drivetrain design has enabled the Model S and X cars to go further than before with EPA-rated ranges of 370 miles (595 km) and 325 miles (523 km) - on the same 100 kW battery pack. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 24th April: Bad news from Tesla is that their Q1 earnings report shows an unexpected $702 million loss along with a 37% revenue decrease, leading to renewed focus on how sustainable the company’s cash flow is in the short term, as CNN reports. (Original article from 2019)
  • Saturday 27th April: News from German news site Elektroauto mentions that 150,000 BMW i3s have been produced since their launch six years ago. Whilst this lags far behind the Nissan Leaf or Tesla, it is still a good level of sales for a more niche EV. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 16th April: GreenCarReports mention that Tesla have unveiled plans to recycle the massive batteries within EVs at their Nevada gigafactory, instead of them being wasted. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 19th April: AutoBlog look at Rivian (previously considered a Tesla competitor) and their future plans for releasing six “products” by 2025, one of which may not be a ‘vehicle’… (Original article from 2019)
  • Sunday 21st April: A YouTube video shows off the new Tesla Model 3 Standard Range - i.e. the base price $35,000 one. This is important because it was thought that deliveries of this cheapest version had been delayed, but apparently supply is creeping through at least! (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 8th April: America’s ‘green car’ tax credit system allows companies to buy and sell ‘green credits’, which Fiat Chrysler are buying from Tesla reports GreenCarFuture. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 8th April: Tesla have started showing off their Tesla Semi (truck) - an important future initiative for the company - on highways, and also using it to deliver Tesla cars to their customers: (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 9th April: Norway, Europe’s leader in electric cars, has another great set of EV sales figures from EV-Sales, with a 28% rise in March 2019 with 5,315 units sold, and the Tesla Model 3 leading the way. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 10th April: Reuters have an exlusive saying that a bipartisan law aims to expand existing federal tax credits so that they only start getting phased out from 400,000 cars (up from 250,000) currently - which would be a big boost for GM and Tesla, if approved. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 11th April: Planned investment by Tesla and Panasonic in Gigafactory 1 has been “frozen”, according to InsideEVs. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 11th April: Tesla have made further changes to their car lineups: the newly-announced $35,000 is now harder to buy, autopilot is mandatory on online-purchased cars (but ‘only’ with a $2,500 price increase, compared to $3,000+ for the previous option). The Model 3 can also now be leased, but not purchased (at the end of the lease) because these leased cars will be used in a future Tesla ride-hailing network. The leasing could have been a big boon for Tesla, but it is not too cheap. The long-range version of the Tesla 3 will cost $674 per month (for 3 years, at 10k miles per year) with a $3,000 deposit and $1,200 for delivery. Overall this is quite an interesting development, especially since the cheapest Model 3 is not available online (only via the phone or in-store: even though they are trying to close many of their stores..!) and it will now just be a software-limited version of the Standard Plus. This will clearly save Tesla money, but it remains to be seen if end customers will like these changes or not. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 1st April: Tesla have lost another key executive, but this time their VP of Powertrains is heading to Apple, reports Autoblog. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 3rd April: Tesla’s blog has announced a more seamless auto-pilot improvement: lane changes can now happen automatically, instead of needing to be specifically approved. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 3rd April: Tesla shared fallen almost 9% (before recovering slightly) after Q1 deliveries were well behind estimates, reports the BBC. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 5th April: Daily Detroit take a neat look inside Rivian’s manufacturing plant (Rivian being the car startup which - at one point - was considered a big Tesla rival). (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 25th March: Tesla brand news cars have received a $1,000 price bump across the board, effective immediately. And Elon Musk also separately confirmed that inventory (second hand or pre-registered) cars will receive a 3% price increase on midnight 1st April (i.e. to take effect on April 2nd). This $1,000 price increase even applies to the newly announced Tesla Model Y, which is not even in production yet. This means that the $48,000-$61,000 prices for the Model Y unveiled just a couple of weeks ago are now $49,000-$62,000. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 27th March: Norway, the king of electric cars in Europe, has continued their green car sales push with a 30% increase in sales in February, with 5,889 units sold. This was fuelled by a 105% increase in all-electric cars, but hampered by a 28% fall in PHEVs. What this means, though, is that all-electric cars made up 41% of all sales in Norway - and plug-in sales (EV + PHEV) were over 50% at 53%. The Tesla Model 3 beat out all other cars, to get the #1 sales slot in Norway with 791 sales. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 28th March: Myongshin, a South Korean producer of car parts who supply Tesla (amongst others), has said they are buying GM’s closed factories and land for $99.5 million. Myongshin also supply Hyundai, although it is unclear whether this expansion will be for Tesla, Hyundai or some other - as yet unannounced - car seller. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 28th March: GM are the second American automaker to have their $7,500 federal tax credit cut (after selling more than 200,000 EVs), alongside Tesla. However unlike Tesla, GM are not cutting the price of their Chevy Bolt to try and soften the blow of the tax credit falling to $3,750. Instead, GM look set to keep the price as-is but instead bring in some offers and discounts at their dealers to ‘react’ to the market. Jim Cain, their spokesman, said “it is easier to react to the market by working with dealers and your marketing team than it is to change sticker prices”. This of course compares to Tesla who very clearly advertised the upcoming tax credit cut, and later launched the Tesla Model 3 at a $35,000 base price ($5,000+ lower than the previously cheapest Model 3) (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 28th March: Tesla’s long await $35,00 base price Model 3 was launched early last month, but some reports have said that - despite many orders - they still have not been delivered to anyone. Three different Tesla forums have said that deliveries have been delayed, and a new delivery date has not been readily available. The slightly upgraded Standard Range Plus model (at $39,310) is, however, available for delivery within weeks. So it looks just like the $35,000 model which is delayed. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 29th March: In more Tesla news, Elon Musk have clarified their plans regarding their full self-driving and autopilot plans. Tesla had previously announced that a new set of hardware (or more specifically, an AI chip known as a “neural net accelerator”) would be required for its full self-driving mode: a chip that would be installed on newly built Tesla models, and retrofitted for free onto older Tesla cars which had already purchased full self-driving. It seems as though this chip (originally due for Q1 2019: i.e. right now!) is delayed, but mainly because the software systems are not yet sophisticated enough to need the new chip. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 18th March: Fisker, the green car startup who once aimed to rival (and beat) Tesla, have finally unveiled an all-electric SUV - a week after the Tesla Model Y (SUV) was announced. Fisker’s unnamed SUV will have a range of around 300 miles (482 km) and cost under $40,000, meaning it would be cheaper than the Model Y which will be over $40,000. The downside, however, is that it is more than two years away, with deliveries due for the second half of 2021. Interestingly, Fisker will move away from lithium-ion batteries and use their “patented Fisker Solid-State Battery technology” which will be produced in an unbuilt factory which Fisker are “currently finalizing the selection [for], located in the United States”. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 19th March: Canada’s green car sales for February 2019 has shown a 38% increase compared to February 2018, with plug-in cars having a 2.2% share of the overall car sales market. The Tesla Model 3 was by far the biggest seller in Canada, with 900 units sold making up 32% of all green car sales in Canada. There were 2,700 overall green car sales in Canada last month. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 19th March: As we have reported previously, the SEC have taken Elon Musk back to court over a Musk tweet in February (where Musk said 2019 production would be 500,000 units - despite this not being accurate). The SEC enquired in court whether Elon Musk had sought approval for any of his previous tweets since the settlement, which was a key part of that settlement agreement. According to the SEC, Tesla took two week’s to investigate this question and answer the question… by simply saying “no”! A less than impressed SEC said in response to this that "”It is therefore stunning to learn that, at the time of filing of the instant motion, Musk had not sought pre-approval for a single one of the numerous tweets about Tesla he published in the months since the court-ordered pre-approval policy went into effect,”. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 22nd March: Navigant Research have carried out independent research and analysis of self-driving companies and technology, and they have ranked Tesla 19th out of the 20 companies they have analyzed. Their research covers 10 criteria, meaning not just the immediate self-driving clips that are often shared by Tesla and their fans on Twitter. When looked at as a whole, companies like Waymo (from Google), but also GM’s Cruise and the Ford Autonomous Vehicles project, are seen as better at self-driving than Tesla. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 22nd March: Less than two months ago, Tesla scrapped their customer referral program saying that it cost too much. Of course, Tesla also said they were shutting all dealerships and reducing car prices 6-7%, before changing their mind a week later. Why do we mention this? Well, because Tesla have also changed their mind on their referral scheme and have bought it back, with the change to win free supercharging and the new Model Y. Tesla have explained this change by saying that the old referral scheme did indeed cost too much, but “We’ve since restructured the program to save the company money while also offering rewards that are super exclusive”. (Original article from 2019)
  • Saturday 23rd March: Tesla have also moved away from mandatory yearly services, which might be necessary with gasoline cars (and early electric cars), but it is widely known that modern EVs require less maintenance: hence they need less servicing, too. This move makes sense because Tesla are looking to make their service operations more efficient, and cutting out unnecessary, mandatory yearly services will help with this. Instead, Tesla say that certain tests and filters need carrying out and changing periodically (mentioned in the owner’s manual). (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 11th March: Despite Tesla saying that all dealerships/stores would be closed (apart from a few key ones, which would merely become information centres) last week, Tesla today announced that they have changed their mind and are now closing just half of them. This will save 3%, instead of 6-7% as they originally said - meaning that they are putting back up the Model X and S prices (granted they are still cheaper than they were a few weeks ago). Tesla have said that this move is to continue to have a presence and to offer pre-booked test drives, although the reality is probably that Tesla’s landlords have reminded them they cannot simply shut down stores with active leases (without expensive fees to be paid, that is). We still expect Tesla to wind down stores over the coming years, however - just more gradually than they announced last month. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 11th March: Whilst the American budget is rarely interesting, Trump has made it somewhat interesting (but negative!) for green car fans by announcing a 2019 budget which completely scraps the $7,500 federal tax credit for electric cars. Whilst congress would need to approve a budget, such a move would apparently save $2.5 billion over the next decade. This flies in the face of pressure from Tesla and GM (amongst others) for the US government to increase support for electric cars since both car manufacturers have seen their tax credit fall to $3,750 in January and will see it fall again to $1,875 in July. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 14th March: After unveiling a darkened teaser image on their website, Tesla unveiled the Model Y at an event hosted by Elon Musk. The EV crossover SUV was described as a “medium SUV”, and the $47,000 long range option will give 300 miles (482 km) of range when released during Autumn 2020. The cheaper standard range car will be $39,000 and is aiming for a Spring 2021 release. The Model Y is modelled very closely with the Model 3, with a similar interior and exterior, albeit the Model Y is taller and thus can house a third row of seats (hence seating 7 people in total). The back row of seats is an optional extra and the seat height would mean they could only be used for children. (Original article from 2019)
  • Sunday 17th March: EVSpecifications have noticed that the Tesla Model 3 mid-range rear-wheel drive model that launched in October 2018 is no longer available to purchase. Whilst this was a good option towards the end of last year, the launch of the $35,000 (base price) Model 3 standard range (also a RWD) means that this particular mid-range RWD car no longer fitted into the Tesla line-up too well. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 4th March: Tesla have continued their price cuts (after reducing the Model 3 price down to $35,000 last week) with up to a $13,000 price cut being made to the Model X and Model S cars. The cheapest Model X model (a long range version) is now $89,200 whilst the cheapest Model S is a short-range model at $80,200. The most expensive Tesla - the Model X Performance - is now $105,200, down $13,000. These price cuts are naturally great for would-be Tesla buyers, but some recent owners have been left annoyed that their $150,000+ Model X version is no longer available (due to Tesla reorganizing their car lineup) and the next cheapest Model X is now substantially cheaper. This has harmed the second hand market for their cars, and some owners are venting on the official Tesla forums (warning: that external link contains some bad language!). (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 4th March: The long awaited Tesla Model Y will be unveiled next Thursday, with test drives available - according to Tweets from Tesla owner Elon Musk. It is an SUV which is “about 10% bigger” than the Tesla Model 3, and so Musk says it will “cost about 10%” more - possibly meaning just under $40,000 if he is referring to the cheapest Model 3 version. We will bring you all the news about the Model Y in next week’s news roundup: (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 5th March: Audi are not just aiming to compete with Tesla via their Audi e-tron quattro, according to the newly unveiled Audi Q4 e-tron which is an SUV and aiming to compete more with the Tesla Model Y (since the Q4 is a compact SUV, fitting between the Q3 and Q5 Audi cars). A 82 kWh battery will delivery up to 280 miles (450 km) of range, and it should be available towards the end of 2019: (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 6th March: A Tesla blog post has announced V3 of their supercharger, which is a completely new architecture for the supercharger network (requiring Model X and S hardware upgrades, along with new power equipment within the Tesla superchargers). Charge rates will be up to 250 kW, allowing for a Model 3 Long Rate to recover up to 75 miles (121 km) of charge in just 5 minutes. Whilst this sounds tiny compared to the above news from Piëch, the V3 superchargers should halve the amount of time that Tesla owners need to spend in a supercharger. Battery charging works best with warm batteries, so Tesla cars will also start warming up the batteries (if needed) when they are on-route to a supercharger - also reducing charge times by around 25%. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 8th March: The Nissan Leaf has just sold its 400,000 car Worldwide - a great feat for the best selling car ever. This comes on the back of the Nissan Leaf Plus (long range model) going on sale, whilst the Tesla Model 3 is selling strongly with around 215,000 sold so far. Daniele Schillaci, Nissan’s executive VP, said: “This milestone is a powerful statement that 400,000 customers and counting, value the Nissan LEAF for the excitement, confidence and connection it delivers.”. The leaf has been on sale since 2010, leading to just under 40,000 sales each year (on average) so far. We do think that the Model 3 will overtake the Leaf (in terms of overall sales) in the next 2-3 years, but it is nonetheless good to see the iconic Leaf selling so well over the past decade. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 8th March: In addition to the SEC taking action against Elon Musk’s tweeting, a group of big investors are also suing Elon Musk according to Bloomberg. This group of institutional investors is aiming to block Elon Musk’s “unchecked use of Twitter to make inaccurate statements about the company”, with the investment group concerned that Musk’s “repeated misstatements” is harming the company - and hence its shareholders. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 8th March: American green car sales for February 2019 have been released, and they suggest a decline of demand: just a 2% increase for plug-in electric cars (which includes PHEVs) compared to February 2018. 17,200 vehicles were nonetheless sold last month, including 5,750 Tesla Model 3 vehicles. America did enjoy a sales boom throughout 2018 so 2019 in comparison will not be quite as spectacular. It will nonetheless be interesting to see whether other countries also see a softening for green car sales, or whether this is just a one-off. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 25th February: Elon Musk’s tweet on February 2019 (which said that they will make around 500,000 Tesla vehicles this year) has landed him in trouble with the SEC, which last year took him to court for apparently misleading statements on Twitter. Since Tesla will not produce 500,000 units this year (they will hit an “annualized” rate at the end of the year, but produce much less than this overall in 2019), the SEC has found Musk in contempt for his Feb 19th tweet. Elon Musk later tweeted that the SEC is “broken”, and that their action has moved the Tesla share price much more than any of his own tweets. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 26th February: The gasoline-powered Porsche Macan will be scrapped entirely in 2022… to be replaced with an all-electric version! This is another sign of Porsche’s commitment to green cars, with the Taycan due out later this year and expected to rival Tesla. The Macan will also support high voltage charging, up to 800-voltage charging, which would allow for 0-80% battery charging in mere minutes (instead of hours with some current EVs). Porsche are aiming to make the price similar to the gasoline-powered version’s price, at around $51,150. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 27th February: Volvo are aiming to compete with Tesla with their Polestar 2 all-electric car, built in China. Whilst more details are expected, it will have two electric motors (yielding 408 horsepower) and hits 0-62 mph (0-100 kmph) in under 5 seconds. It will also target 275 miles (443 km) of range, meaning they are close to Model Y territory (based on what little we know of the upcoming Tesla Model Y, that is!). (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 28th February: Today was Tesla’s day! A few days after Elon Musk’s tweets (mentioned at the start), Tesla stopped taking orders on any of their cars on Thursday morning - announcing that something will come “soon” at 2pm (California time). Speculation was rife, and Electrek broke the news 20 minutes early: saying that the Model 3 is finally being released at the $35,000 level. This is an important price point, first mooted by Musk in 2016. It allows the Model 3 to be cheaper than many of its gasoline-based rivals, including the more expensive Audi A4 and BMW 3-series. Such cheap pricing also means the Model 3 is now cheaper than the long-range Nissan Leaf Plus model (which is almost $38,000)! Pulling off this price point has been “excruciating” according to Musk, and they will be doing this partly by closing many of their dealerships and instead moving to an online-only sales model via their configurator tool. They will also be aiming to improve servicing and repairs, with them coming to you - instead of you driving to the dealers. All of this is actually more convenient, and it also allows Tesla to cut costs and deliver a truly well-priced Model 3. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 1st March: As hinted at above, the price of the new long-range Nissan Leaf Plus has been released. This 226 mile (364 km) Leaf will sell for $37,445 including destination fees: a $7,360 premium over the cheaper base 2019 Leaf model with 150 miles (241 km) of range. Nissan still has its full $7,500 federal tax credit in America, compared to Tesla’s $3,750 tax credit rate, meaning that the Leaf Plus will be temporarily cheaper than the newly-priced Model 3. But the key here is temporarily: the tax credit will fall for Nissan in the coming months and years (when they sell 70,000 more vehicles). (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 18th February: in a recent interview with Marques Brownlee, Bill Gates said that Tesla is an “amazing product” and says the future is exciting for EVs since “there’ll be a lot of really great electric cars to choose from.”. He was more sceptical of electric trucks, however, due to battery power not yet giving enough range for their weight/density. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 20th February: another Tesla executive has left their management team, this time with their top lawyer Dane Butswinkas leaving after just two months into the job. He joins a string of other Tesla execs who have left for a variety of reasons over the past year. In this case, Butswinkas was allegedly unhappy with the working environment inside Tesla and especially the ‘top down nature’ (from Musk) for how things are run. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 20th February: in an ever increasing drive to improve profitability, Tesla are looking to launch a leasing program for their Model 3 car. This might be launched within a month however no pricing information is currently available. This would, however, help to make the Tesla Model 3 more accessible to buyers because the current option is purely to pay $42,900 before incentives. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 21st February: a recent car survey put the Tesla Model 3 towards the top of its reliability rankings, however the new annual Consumer Reports reliability survey has said that after more than 500 complaints from Model 3 owners, they no longer give it a “Recommended” rating. Despite these complaints, Consumer Report have still found that Tesla drivers are amongst the most satisfied with their cars. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 11th February: The Tesla Model 3 is currently launching throughout Europe, with the first models being received in some European countries this week. A new report from Fastned (an EU charging network) has said that Teslas should charge at a higher rate than in America, at 125+ kW with the European CCS chargers compared to 125 kW or lower in America with the modified CCS chargers that the Tesla supercharger network uses. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 12th February: CleanTechnica reported that GM is considering making their first electric pickup trucks using a Tesla powertrain, based on information they received from someone within GM. However, this was quickly denied, with Tesla saying that no such partnership exists and GM declining to comment. Of course, Tesla would not need to be in a formal partnership with GM for the Tesla drivetrain to be used. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 14th February: Tesla have rolled out over-the-air updates which bring extra security and safety modes to all Model 3s and many Model S/X models (ones built after August 2017). A new “Sentry Mode” will use the autopilot cameras to detect potential threats when a car is parked up stationary. The car will give out verbal warnings after potential threats, as well as sound an alarm (and record the intruder) in the case of more serious threats. A new pet friendly mode dubbed “Dog Mode” will also keep the climate at a pet-friendly temperature and display a warning to concerned passer-bys that they are being kept safe! (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 5th February: Elon Musk has stated his company’s goals to investors in a conference call, saying that streamlining and improving services will be a key aim. The goal is for Teslas to ‘dial home’ and request roadside assistance when needed (saving the driver needing to find the right number to call), and ensuring that minor repairs and services are carried out quicker in their dealerships by increasing the availability of parts. Whilst explaining that Tesla had previously made mistakes in their service management, Tesla’s CEO said "”stopping doing the foolish things will massively improve our service costs, will massively improve customer happiness around the world, and it’s just fundamentally better,”“. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 5th February: Tesla have a new customer for their large Powerpack batteries (designed to store massive amounts of electric and help to smooth out demand during peak times): the rival charging station company Electrify America. EA have had issues with excess demand for electric (i.e. EV drivers charging up at peak times) resulting in supply shortages, so by installing 100 Powerpacks at its locations, they should be able to smooth out demand more. Electrify America had previously charged “demand response charges” which massively increases the price of charging up at peak times, so the Tesla Powerpack installations should help to reduce these charges over time. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 7th February: Tesla have purchased a San Diego based company called Maxwell Technologies who specialize in ultracapacitor energy storage, in a deal worth $218 million. Maxwell’s ultracapacitor’s use solid (not liquid) electrodes which could offer up to double the battery capacity at 10-20% less cost overall. This is therefore an interesting acquisition for Tesla, who produce more lithium-ion batteries for electric cars (and power grid use) than any other company. Tesla currently use Panasonic for the bulk of the battery manufacturing process, however they might be using a Shanghai based company for their Asian-market EV production. This announcement does seem as though Tesla are starting to branch out away from solely using Panasonic for their battery needs. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 7th February: Tesla are continuing to reduce the price of their Model 3, with the second price cut in around a month. At the start of the year, Tesla reduced their car prices by $2,000 - and they have now made a $1,100 price cut on their Model 3. This is part of Elon Musk’s aim to slowly but surely increase the cost savings when producing their Model 3, so that they can bring a $35,000 priced model to market to target the “entry level” segment. After announcing the price cut, Elon Musk said that they are doing everything they can to get to this level: (Original article from 2019)
  • Saturday 9th February: Tesla recently announced a job cuts programme to help streamline their operations (and ultimately lead to a $35,000 base price Tesla). Reuters sources have, however found out that their car delivery network in North America (based in Las Vegas) was badly hit, with 150 out of 230 let go in January. 65% redundancies in what would seem a key department for Tesla is either a sign that their delivery network is (a lot) more efficient nowadays, or that they expect American and Canadian Tesla sales to fall in the immediate future. One former employee of the delivery department alledgely told Reuters that it is the latter: "”There are not enough deliveries… You don’t need a team because there are not that many cars coming through.”“. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 30th January: Tesla made a $139 million profit in Q4 2018 down from $311 million profit in Q3 2018 but still a good profit considering Tesla has barely broken even for many years. Tesla revenues throughout 2018 almost doubled compared to 2017, in large part due to the massive production and sales of the Model 3. In Elon Musk’s conference call with investors, Musk also said that they will make a profit in all four quarters of 2019 and that the Gigafactory in Shanghai will have a high production level and will “go like lightning”. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 31st January: the final global 2018 green car sales data is in and it is yet-more positive reading for the green car industry. PHEV and BEV sales grew 70% in December 2018 compared to December 2017, with 286,000 sales in December leading to over two million green car sales throughout the world in 2018. The Tesla Model 3 was the biggest seller of the year, with 145,846 sales, compared to the Chinese BAIC EC-Series’ 90,637 sales and the Nissan Leaf’s 87,149 sales. The Tesla Model S and X were then fourth and fifth best selers, meaning that Tesla had 3 out of 5 of the top spots through the world in 2018 (despite mainly just selling to America and Canada)! (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 31st January: Tesla is continuing to simplify their car lineups, with both the Model S and Model X coming with a 100 kW battery but no model numbers (like the ‘Model S 75D’ previously). Instead, the Model S has a base model of $85,000 giving 310 miles (500 km) of range and the Model X has a base model of 270 miles (434 km). Interestingly, there is then the option of purchasing more battery range with upgrades - but the battery capacity stays the same. In other words, this will be controlled by software. This is an interesting strategy because it means that Tesla only needs to manufacture one version of the Model S and X, and then drive any upgrades via software. They already do this with their autopilot functionality: all Tesla cars ship with the required hardware, but you can purchase the autopilot packages as a software add-on later. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 22nd January: Toyota and Panasonic have announced a joint partnership to research and produce lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles in two Asian Panasonic factories (one in Japan, one in China) with 3,500 employees from both companies being committed to work on this project. Nothing will proceed on this agreement until it passes antitrust inspections, however the idea is that Toyota will own 51% of the new factories with Panasonic owning 49%. This is a similar arrangement to the American gigafactory which is co-owned by Tesla and Panasonic and which also produces Li-ion batteries. Toyota had previously concerned some green car industry watchers with their general reluctance to build anything other than hybrids, but this announcement should mean that Toyota are finally looking at producing batteries for a fully electric car. This deal with also involve research being done on solid-state batteries which use a solid (not liquid) electrolyte and are expected to increase range whilst reducing EV battery pack costs. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 23rd January: Tesla - who had previously only worked with Panasonic in America for their battery production - have announced that they are in talks with Chinese company Tianjin Lishen to supply batteries to its new Shanghai-based Gigafactory (which will produce the Model 3 and Model Y to the key Asian markets). Details are still scarce, and a Tesla spokeswoman said that “We have not signed any agreement of any kind with them”. This is another move away from producing most of the parts within American, which makes sense considering that producing full cars in America and then transporting them to Asia would be quite expensive. The new Shanghai factory - which will cost $2 billion - will open at the end of 2019 (and it seems like a decision of which company will supply batteries has not been agreed). (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 23rd January: The large demand for the Porsche Taycan - which previously had been sold-out - has prompted Porsche to double their production levels from 20,000 Taycan units to 40,000. The Taycan is a hotly anticipated luxury (i.e. expensive!) electric car which will support very high charging rates, and is aiming to compete with the higher end Tesla Model X and S cars. The high-end market is also becoming more competitive with the launch of the Jaguar I-Pace and Audi e-tron SUV, and the Taycan’s $80,000+ price tag will be similar to other cars in this segment. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 17th January: Tesla are expanding their power business with news that in addition to growing their Supercharger network, Tesla will be offering another high power wall connection unit to homes so that homeowners can charge their Tesla more easily at home via the NEMA 14-50 plug. This will plugin to an existing 230-volt power outet, and would offer 9.6 kW of power. Whilst not a massive power output compared to the specially-designed (and often busy!) Superchargers, it is enough to add 40 miles (64.4 km) of range per hour. (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 17th January: Tesla’s referral program, which given people who bought via a referral code six months of free supercharging (along with prizes for the referrer) is coming to an end due to its costs. Tels are aiming to cut costs (as we will see in the next update) and have said that the referral program is adding too much to the cost of their cars, especially their cheaper Model 3 (which is half the price of the Model X and S): (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 18th January: Tesla surprised their shareholders somewhat in a company update on their blog which contained a copy of an email sent to all staff. Tesla are cutting 7% of their staff across the board, along with nearly all temporary workers and contractors. This will result in around 3,000 members of staff, and it results in Tesla shares opening 6% lower on Friday. Explaining the decision, Tesla said that the end of 2018 was their best yet and they did make a small profit in Q3/Q4 2018, but that in order to reduce their overall costs and produce a cheaper $35,000 version of the Model 3, they needed to cut back on their staff headcount. Elon’s email said “Sorry for all these numbers, but I want to make sure that you know all the facts and figures and understand that the road ahead is very difficult. This is not new for us – we have always faced significant challenges – but it is the reality we face.” (Original article from 2019)
  • Saturday 19th January: In further a cost cutting exercise, Tesla have raised the prices of their supercharger electric prices by around 33%. This follows on from 30-100% price rises just nine months ago in March 2018. The price of supercharging in New York used to be $0.24/kWh, and it is now $0.32/kWh. California seem a similar rise, from $0.26/kWh to around $0.34/kWh (although this varies be a couple of cents depending on the city). Tesla have denied that this is turning their supercharger network into a profit center, saying “We’re adjusting Supercharging pricing to better reflect differences in local electricity costs and site usage. As our fleet grows, we continue to open new Supercharger locations weekly… As has always been the case, Supercharging is not meant to be a profit center for Tesla.”. Whilst this will probably help Tesla grow their supercharger network even more, it does mean that the price of electric from their network is now on par with gasoline prices in many states (when compared with a 35 MPG car). (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 7th January: American green car sales have come out, and December 2018 seen 50,000 plug-in (PHEV + BEV) cars registered, meaning 2018 seen 350,000 overall plug-in electric sales - up 75% from 200,000 in 2017! Half of all December sales were due to the Tesla Model 3, which hit close to 25,000 units. All-in-all, Telsa had a 53% green car market share, with Chevrolet in second place with 10% and Toyota and BMW third and fourth place with 8% and 7% respectively. In other words, 2018 seen a large increase in plug-in electric sales, and Tesla were the main beneficiary of this. (Original article from 2019)
  • Monday 7th January: Tesla have started work on their third Gigafactory, based in Shanghai, China. This is strategically placed to target the key Asia markets and get around some of the recent fallout from the US-China trade war. Construction will finish mid-2019, with Model 3 production starting at the end of this year. The Chinese Gigafactory will also be used to produce the Tesla Model Y, of which barely any information is known other than it being a small SUV. (Original article from 2019)
  • Tuesday 8th January: Tesla have released their own final sales figures for the end of 2018, and in Q3 2018 the Model 3 became the fifth best selling non-SUV car overall in America. In other words, more popular than hundreds of gasoline-fuelled cars that have been selling for many years in America. This fact is made even more amazing by the fact that production was still ramping up at this point, so it’ll be interesting to see what other records the Model 3 can set in 2019. The Model 3 sold almost as many cars in Q4 2018 than Mazda and Volkswagen sold in total (across all their cars). (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 10th January: Tesla will stop selling the lower-range versions of their Model S and X cars, according to a tweet from Elon Musk. This means that the $77,200 Model S 75D and the $83,200 Model X75D will be scrapped - and the next cheapest options will be the $95,200 Model S 100D and $98,200 Model X 100D. This means a big price increase for the more-luxury Tesla cars, due to the 75 kWh option being scrapped as of Sunday 13th January: (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 2nd January: Tesla announced that they had produced 61,394 Model 3s in Q4 2018, along with almost 1,000 delivered/sold cars each day. They sold close to quarter of a million Tesla vehicles in general in 2018. In order to combat the New Year fall of the federal tax credit (down from $7,500 to $3,750), Tesla have dropped their car prices by $2,000. Hence the $46,000 Model 3 is now $44,000, the Model S goes down to $76,000 and the Model X down to $82,000. (Original article from 2019)
  • Wednesday 2nd January: Like Tesla, GM are also seeing their $7,500 federal tax credits cut in half soon. This is caused by car manufacturers selling over 200,000 electric cars, leading to the tax credit being phased out over a 15 month process. GM’s tax credit will go down to $3,750 in April 2019. (Original article from 2019)
  • Friday 4th January:: After opening Tesla Model 3 sales up to some European countries, Telsa have now confirmed they are opening sales to more European left-hand countries, and also China. China is an increasingly important market for Tesla, albeit one hit by US-China trade wars. The Model 3 will start at 499,000 yuan ($72,000). (Original article from 2019)
  • Thursday 27th December: The American state of Massachusetts have scrapped their rebate programme for hybrid cars, and also slashed the electric car rebate from $2,500 to $1,500 - a cut of 40%. The MOR-EV is being rolled back to meet the ever-growing demand for electric cars, and thus to ensure that the programme can be offered into the future. Judith Judson, commissioner of the Department of Energy Resources, said: “We have had increasing demand, very high demand, for these rebates, … In order to sustain the program and continue to provide rebates at that high a demand level, we are making changes … and targeting those vehicles that provide the greatest emission reduction.”. Electric cars worth more than $50,000 will also be exempt from the MOR-EV, meaning cars like the Tesla Model X/S and upcoming Audi e-tron and Porche Taycan will no longer qualify for the $2,500/$1,500 rebate. (Original article from 2018)
  • Friday 28th December: Worldwide sales data seen 237,000 green cars registered in November 2018 - up 73% compared to November 2017. The Tesla model 3 was the best selling car Worldwide, with 19,255 sales in November 2018 (120,836 in 2018 so far). The Japanese Nissan Leaf sold 8,276 in November (82,676 in 2018), whilst the Chinese BAIC EC-Series car sold 14,205 in November (82,230 in 2018). (Original article from 2018)
  • Saturday 29th December: Tesla have named their two new independent board members, which was required as part of Elon Musk’s settlement with the SEC. Oracle (IT software company) founder Larry Ellison and Walgreens head of HR Kathleen Wilson-Thompson have joined the board as of December 27th. Larry purchased 3 million shares (worth $1 billion on current share prices) earlier this year. In their blog post announcement, Tesla’s board of directors introduced the pair saying “In conducting a widespread search over the last few months, we sought to add independent directors with skills that would complement the current board’s experience. In Larry and Kathleen, we have added a preeminent entrepreneur and a human resources leader, both of whom have a passion for sustainable energy”. With Robyn Denholm being appointed as Chairwoman and Larry and Kathleen being appointed as independent board members, the settlement terms with the SEC are effectively met. (Original article from 2018)
  • Monday 10th December: Tesla’s Elon Musk has said that their autopilot functionality will soon expand out further, to the point where traffic lights, roundabouts and stop signs will be adhered to. When added to the current autopilot capabilities, this would mean that a Tesla would pretty much be able to take you from your house to your destination with no user input: (Original article from 2018)
  • Tuesday 11th December: The Porsche Taycan, the luxury all-electric car which is aiming to compete with Tesla, has already received enough pre-orders to be a sell-out at Porsche’s planned 2019 production levels. Hence Oliver Blume, Porsche CEO, has said that they may increase production from 20,000 to 30,000 units in 2019. (Original article from 2018)
  • Spain: “Tesla has announced the prices of Model 3. They will start from € 59,100 for the version with dual engine and all-wheel drive and € 70,100 for the top-of-the-range version.” (Original article from 2018)
  • Sweden: Tesla Model 3 Long Range Dual Engine All-Wheel Drive will be 590,200 SEK ($65,747.39) after the Swedish electric car subsidy, and the Tesla Model 3 Performance will be 707,200 SEK ($78,781.02) after the subsidy. (Original article from 2018)
  • Tuesday 27th November: The US-China trade war we reported a fortnight ago have hit Tesla, with just 211 Teslas sold in China in October 2018 (according to the China Passenger Car Association), a drop of 70% compared to October 2017. The tarrifs (of 40% on American car imports into China, in response to similar American tarrifcs) caused Elon Musk to slash the price of the Model X and S in China last week. Time will tell if this helps restore sales. (Original article from 2018)
  • Friday 30th November: VW, the German automaker, have said that they might build a factory in American which will specialise in producing electric vehicles, with their CEO Scott Keogh saying “We are 100 percent deep in the process of ‘We will need an electric car plant in North America,’ and we’re holding those conversations now,”. VW are aiming to compete with Tesla, and produce a sedan style VW priced between $30,000 and $40,000 within the next couple of years. An American factory which specialises in EVs would naturally help with this goal. (Original article from 2018)
  • Friday 30th November: Not content with boosting production levels to a record high (for them), Tesla have reached a new milestone: 1 billion miles have been driven by Teslas purely with autopilot: (Original article from 2018)
  • Saturday 1st December: In final Tesla-mania news, Tesla listed a roof rack for their Model 3 on their website, retailing at $450. It’s designed to be aerodynamic and easy to install, and also reduce interior cabin noise. As you might expect, it sold out within mere minutes..! (Original article from 2018)
  • Tuesday 20th November: Elon Musk tweeted further information about the supercharger network, saying that Tesla are aiming to increase the number of supercharges by almost 100%, and that the third generation of their supercharges will be out sometime in 2019. (Original article from 2018)
  • Wednesday 14th November: Tesla have confirmed that the European version of its Model 3 will have the EU-standard CCS (Type 2 ) Combo inlet charger by default. This is a depature from the Model S and Model X which have the more propriety Tesla Type 2 socket. This will benefit EU Tesla owners, since the CCS charger network is well established throughout Europe (and the UK). For example, the UK alone has 1,240 CCS charger points, compared to just 340 Tesla supercharge points. (Original article from 2018)
  • Thursday 15th November: Following on from our update a few weeks ago, Elon Musk has confirmed that Model 3s will need to be ordered by the end of November, in order to be guaranteed delivery by December 31 - whereby they’ll still be eligible to take advantage of tax breaks. The $7,500 tax breaks will start fading by 50% every six months from January 2019. (Original article from 2018)
  • Thursday 8th November: Robyn Denholm has been appointed as the new Tesla board Chairwoman, replacing Elon Musk as Chairman after he was forced to step down as part of the SEC settlement. Robyn Denholm is an Australian with a range of experience, serving as national finance manager at Toyota, on the board at Silicon Valley fast charger company ABB, and she also serves as the CFO at Australia’s Telstra telecoms company. (Original article from 2018)
  • Friday 9th November: After changing their self-driving technology choices a few times recently, Tesla seem to have settled on their ‘Enhanced Autopilot’ choice as the (single) way forward. They have done an over-the-air software rollout for all hardware-compatible Teslas, which enable this feature as a fortnight-long trial for all drivers. Drivers will be offered the chance to buy this for the ‘sale price’ of $5,500, before it goes up to $7,000. (Original article from 2018)
  • Friday 2nd November: Tesla are being investigated by the SEC with respect to the Model 3’s production numbers. This is based on a subpoena issued by the SEC against Tesla. The exact reason for this investigation is not fully known, although it is thought to be based on the SEC checking if Tesla misled the public about the Model 3’s availability. Tesla have accepted very large numbers of Model 3 reservations, but have struggled to produce anywhere near enough vehicles to satisfy this demand (apart from the past few months where Tesla’s production has thankfully ramped up successfully), and it is this that the SEC is thought to be investigating. (Original article from 2018)
  • Thursday 25th October: as covered last week, Tesla had unveiled a mid-range $45,000 Model 3 model. They have already made changes, however! They have now raised the price to $46,000, explaining that they have “made a slight adjustment to our pricing for Model 3 following the introduction of the Mid Range Battery last week,”. Anyone who ordered the car in the six day window before the price rise will still pay $45,000, however. This change only applies to new orders from the 24th onwards. (Original article from 2018)
  • Saturday 27th October: Tesla have now rolled out their ‘Navigate on Autopilot’ feature via over-the-air updates, to customers who have previously purchased the Enhanced Autopilot features. This new set of active guidance features will allow Tesla cars to better follow the road and its curves, make lane changes, and take off-ramps/highway interchanges. (Original article from 2018)
  • Tuesday 16th October: Reuters reported that the Elon Musk/Tesla settlement with the SEC (after Elon Musk tweeted saying he was taking Tesla private and that funding had been secured, when it had not been) has been approved by a federal judge. This means that Tesla will be proceeding with plans to appoint an independent chairman and two directors. There will also be a ‘Twitter approval committee’ of sorts, which must approve Musk’s tweets before they get sent out. Despite a minor rally, Tesla shares remain 20% lower than their peak from August - in large part due to this recent controversy. (Original article from 2018)
  • Wednesday 17th October: various reports suggest that political pressure on congress by green car manufacturers Tesla and GM might be working, since a Republican senator (Sen. Dean Heller) has also proposed lifting EV tax credit restrictions. This follows seven Democrat senators who proposed similar measures in September. The current system is such that EV tax credits (which benefit produces of zero-emission cars) start getting phased out after 200,000 electric cars have been sold. Improvements in this area would mean that the tax credits would continue either indefinitely, or beyond the 200k car sale limit. (Original article from 2018)
  • Wednesday 17th October: Gilbert Passin - the Tesla VP of Manufacturing - has left Tesla, following a string of other higher level employees and executives in recent months (e.g. the Head of HR and two other execs leaving in September). Tesla continue to struggle with their production/manufacturing bottlenecks, so this latest departure is not altogether surprising. (Original article from 2018)