In this week’s green car news:

  • Monday 16th September: Electrive have given a brief sneak preview of its first all-electric crossover SUV, due in late 2021. This five seater will have a short bonnet and a range of “intelligent mobility” technologies to try and transform how people interact with their car.

  • Monday 16th September: Autoblog report that Mazda - who previously have not seemed too involved in the EV market - will be bringing their first ever battery electric car to the Tokyo Motor Show next month, with the e-TPV (prototype name) due next year with a 35.5 kW battery giving a 124 mile (200 km) range in ‘city mode’.

  • Monday 16th September: Autoblog also report that Toyota have switched to use Panasonic-supplied batteries in some of their Chinese PHEVs: very similar batteries to the ones used in a Tesla. Panasonic have a well established supply of EV batteries, so this move helps Toyota’s future supply stability.

  • Tuesday 17th September: Green Car Reports have some unique news/analysis of VW’s future electric plans in America, saying that the ID 3 will not launch there, but the ID 4 will do - and it could undercut a Tesla Model Y by as much as $10,000. VW’s aim is to “make the comparison to a comparable internal combusion car” in terms of price.

  • Wednesday 18th September: Autoblog report on the ongoing battle between California (and other ‘anti combusion engine’ car states) and Trump’s federal government, with Trump announcing that California will not be able to set stricter emissions standards than federal regulators going forward.

  • Wednesday 18th September: Green Car Reports confirm the 2020 version of the Honda CR-V hybrid, which will be built in Greensburg, Indiana and offer 45 MPG in city driving and will be an all-wheel drive with an electronic clutch system.

  • Wednesday 18th September: Green Car Reports also analyze the Mercedes-Benz EQC electric car, saying that the range on its 80 kWh battery is 10-20% less than you would expect for a similar sized battery, but that this is a deliberate decision to keep the car “reliable, safe and offering charging opportunities” beyond what you would have if you constantly take an EV to the last mile of its potential range.

  • Wednesday 18th September: A Bloomberg opinion piece discusses the recent Saudia drone attack which hit their oil production in a single attack, cutting their production from 9.8 million to 4.1 million barrells a day, and temporarily leading to 15% higher oil prices. They argue that this instability - which will naturally lead through into higher gasoline prices at the pump - is yet another reason to go for EVs.

  • Wednesday 18th September: IIHS, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, have picked the Tesla Model 3 for its first ever “TOP SAFETY PICK+” award. This means that they feel the Model 3 is amongst the safest cars available (as previous test results) have shown, including external factors like headlight glare and pedestrian collision prevention.

  • Wednesday 18th September: An Autoblog exclusive reveals that its Audi Sport (S range) division will see “electrification as the foundation”, with plug-in hybrid models becoming the norm in the range.

  • Thursday 19th September: Inside EVs cover a big news story - which Elon Musk congraulated them on - is that Daimler (who make Mecedez-Benz, Smart and others) will be focusing solely on EVs from now on, with no plans to produce combustion engines beyond the current range of cars. German Auto Motor und Sport said in a Google Translation that “Daimler is currently bringing the latest generation of internal combustion engines to market in various models, such as the new inline six-cylinder engine for the E- and S-Class as well as the SUVs - this generation could also be the last.”.

  • Thursday 19th September: Autoblog cover that your Amazon deliveries might soon be harder to detect (well, until they ring the buzzer): Amazon have ordered 100,000 electric delivery vans from Rivian as part of its goals to be carbon neutral by 2040.

  • Friday 20th September: Green Car Reports take a look at whether hydrogen cars - which currently are selling much less than electric cars - could become an eco-friendly option to completent EVs in the future. The idea behind this argument is that electric cars with high density solid state batteries might be as much as 10 years away, whilst hydrogne production and hydrogen fuel cell cars could offer much bigger range in a shorter space of time.

  • Saturday 21st September: The Times (paywall) report that the expected range of electric cars is flawed (at least according to current European Union regulations - the WLTP), leading to ranges being overstated. The article says that the true range of (for example) a Hydunai Kona 64 kWh is 259 miles (416 km), not the 300 miles (482 km) that is claimed. Testing does not use air condition nor heating, even though nearly all drivers do use this - leading to the range discrepancy.