• Tuesday 16th October: Reuters reported that the Elon Musk/Tesla settlement with the SEC (after Elon Musk tweeted saying he was taking Tesla private and that funding had been secured, when it had not been) has been approved by a federal judge. This means that Tesla will be proceeding with plans to appoint an independent chairman and two directors. There will also be a ‘Twitter approval committee’ of sorts, which must approve Musk’s tweets before they get sent out. Despite a minor rally, Tesla shares remain 20% lower than their peak from August - in large part due to this recent controversy.

  • Wednesday 17th October: various reports suggest that political pressure on congress by green car manufacturers Tesla and GM might be working, since a Republican senator (Sen. Dean Heller) has also proposed lifting EV tax credit restrictions. This follows seven Democrat senators who proposed similar measures in September. The current system is such that EV tax credits (which benefit produces of zero-emission cars) start getting phased out after 200,000 electric cars have been sold. Improvements in this area would mean that the tax credits would continue either indefinitely, or beyond the 200k car sale limit.

  • Wednesday 17th October: Gilbert Passin - the Tesla VP of Manufacturing - has left Tesla, following a string of other higher level employees and executives in recent months (e.g. the Head of HR and two other execs leaving in September). Tesla continue to struggle with their production/manufacturing bottlenecks, so this latest departure is not altogether surprising.

  • Wednesday 17th October: Tesla have finalised an agreement with the Shanghai Government to buy a massive 860,000 plot of land for a figure thought to be $140.5 million. This massive factory - dubbed a ‘gigafactory’ - would be the first non-American factory by Tesla. This will help Tesla tap into the very fast growing Asian markets, and also potentially avoid some of the US-China trade war tarrifs. Robin Ren (VP of Worldwide Sales) said “Securing this site in Shanghai, Tesla’s first Gigafactory outside of the United States, is an important milestone for what will be our next advanced, sustainably developed manufacturing site”.

  • Wednesday 17th October: Google have started listing electric-vehicle charging station points on Google Maps. It’ll tell you how many are available in a particular charging site, and what ports (and charging speeds) are available. Tesla and Chargepoint data is being listed Worldwide, and then America will also have EVgo, Blink and SemaConnect data. The UK will also have PodPoint data, and Australia/New Zealand include Chargefox data. This will be a useful step for people using either Google Maps on their mobiles, or the integration with their car’s in-built touchscreen.

  • Thursday 18th October: Munro & Associates have again disassembled a Tesla, this time the Model 3, and reported on the pros and cons of the manufacturing and design processes. Their conclusion was a mixed bag: that the Model 3 has the best tech and potential profit margin of any EV, but that they’re currently wasting this potential and thus spending $2,000 more to produce the Model 3 than they need to be. The head of the analyst company (Sandy Munro) said “This body is their single biggest problem, … It’s killing them.”.

  • Thursday 18th October: With the existing EV tax breaks starting to fade (despite political pressure to extend/enhance them, as reported above), Tesla have launch a $45,000 “mid-range” Model 3 model which has a mid-tier battery and range. The delivery period will be 6-10 weeks, just intime for quick orderers to beat the expiration of the EV tax breaks on January 1st 2019. This is another depature from the entry-level $35,000 Model 3 that has been promised but not produced in any real numbers this year (the entry-level model’s production is due to ramp up in 2019).

  • Friday 19th October: Despite the hype surrounding the self-driving capabilities of Teslas, there has also been confusion regarding the different self-driving options. There is an ‘initial’ Navigate on Autopilot option for $5,000 extra, and then previously there was a Full Self-Driving option for $$3,000 extra. However they have scrapped the latter option, saying “Also available off menu for a week. Was causing too much confusion.”. The main reason for this removal, however, is that full self-driving tech is not ready yet. It’s making great progress - especially with Tesla - but people would have been unable to use it fully. It’ll probably receive a re-branding and be re-released, but with clearer information. All Teslas have self-driving hardware tech pre-installed (despite talk of a better autopilot chip being introduced in spring 2019), though, so people should be able to take Tesla up on their full self-driving option in the future if they choose to.